Wednesday, September 28, 2011

Vacation Paradises You May Not Know - Part 3

Perhentian Islands (Malaysia)
The Perhentian Islands (Pulau Perhentian in Malay) lay approximately 10 nautical miles (19 km) offshore the coast of northeastern Malaysia in the state of Terengganu, approximately 40 miles (64 km) south of the Thai border. Sheer beauty of Pulau Perhentian makes it the destination of tourists. Both the islands have palm-fringed white coral sand beaches (that can be tough on the feet) and turquoise blue sea. One can have a number of activities on its beaches and forests. Scuba-diving, snorkeling, and swimming are the most popular tourist activities here. On most beaches, the water is shallow with lots of rays, cuttlefish and parrotfish. For diving, there are dozens of divesites around both main islands, as well as several off-shore sites.

Malé (Maldives)
Maléis the capital and most populous city in the Republic of Maldives. It is located at the southern edge of North Malé Atoll (Kaafu Atoll). It is also one of the Administrative divisions of the Maldives. Traditionally it was the King's Island, from where the ancient Maldive Royal dynasties ruled and where the palace was located. The city was also called Mahal. Formerly it was a walled city surrounded by fortifications and gates (doroshi). The Royal Palace (Gan'duvaru) was destroyed along with the picturesque forts (kotte) and bastions (buruzu) when the city was remodelled under President Ibrahim Nasir's rule after the abolition of the monarchy. In recent years, the island has been considerably expanded through landfilling operations.

Boracay (Philippines)
Boracay is an island of the Philippines located approximately 315 km (200 miles) south of Manila and 2 km off the northwest tip of Panay Island in the Western Visayas region of the Philippines. In 1990, it was voted by the BMW Tropical Beach Handbook as one of the best beaches in the world and again in 1996 by British publication TV Quick as the world's number one tropical beach. Since then, Boracay has gradually become a cosmopolitan tourism destination and, in the 21st century, has become one of the major tourist destinations in the Philippines.

Coron Island (Philippines)
Coron Island is the third largest island in the Calamian Group of Islands in northern Palawan in the Philippines. The island is part of the larger municipality of the same name. It is about 170 nautical miles (310 km) southwest of Manila, is known for several Japanese shipwrecks World War II vintage. The island is part of the ancestral domain of the indigenous Tagbanwa people. The area around the wrecks have pleasant rock formations which provide for excellent snorkeling opportunities, with underwater visibility extending up to 80 feet (24 m). The water is usually calm, with almost no current. Coron is one of the most visited destinations for wreck diving in the Philippines.

Moalboal (Philippines)
Extending as a peninsula in the Southwestern tip of Cebu, Moalboal is bordered to the west by the Tañon Strait. From the western shoreline, the island of Negros can be seen. Moalboal is located 89 kilometers from Cebu City, about 2.5 hours by bus. From the tulay, an unfinished bridge located in Moalboal's town proper, Badian Island can be clearly seen, as well as the popular tourist attraction, Pescador Island. Locals often call themselves Moalboalanons, taken from the name of their town. The "Moalboalanons" said they came from "Boholanon" decscents. Though the majority of the people in Moalboal are Cebuanos, a few members of cultural minorities have found their way there. Bajaus who are similar to Muslim nomads, are often seen in the streets, especially during the holiday season, as some of them make their living by begging. 

Castries (Saint Lucia)
Castries (), population 10,634, aggl. 37,963 (2001-05-12), is the capital city of Saint Lucia, a country in the West Indies. The district with the same name had a population of 61,341 in 2001-05-22, and stretches over an area of 30.5 square miles (79 km2). One of the major tourist areas in St. Lucia, Castries is a port of call for cruise ships. Cruise ships dock at Pointe Seraphine, to the north of the harbour which is also a duty free shopping centre. A taxi service is readily available to take visitors on tours of the rest of the country or the city.

Oban (Scotland)
Oban ((listen ; An t-Òban in Scottish Gaelic meaning The Little Bay) is a resort town within the Argyll and Bute council area of Scotland. It has a total resident population of 8,120. Despite its small size, it is the largest town between Helensburgh and Fort William and during the tourist season the town can be crowded by up to 25,000 people. Oban occupies a beautiful setting in the Firth of Lorn. Oban Bay is a near perfect horseshoe bay, protected by the island of Kerrera, and beyond Kerrera is Mull. To the north is the long low island of Lismore, and the mountains of Morvern and Ardgour. In the 18th century, the land where Oban now stands supported very few households, sustaining only minor shipbuilding and quarrying.

Skye (Scotland)
Skye or the Isle of Skye (Scottish Gaelic: An t-Eilean Sgitheanach or Eilean a' Cheò) is the largest and most northerly island in the Inner Hebrides of Scotland. The island's peninsulas radiate out from a mountainous centre dominated by the Cuillin hills. Although it has been suggested that the first of these Gaelic names describes a "winged" shape there is no definitive agreement as to the name's origins. Skye's history includes the influence of Gaelic, Norse and English speaking peoples and the relationships between their names for the island are not straightforward.

St. Abbs (Scotland)
St. Abbs (Historically: Coldingham Shore), is a small fishing village located on the southeast coast of Scotland, in the committee area of Berwickshire, Scottish Borders region. The village was originally known as Coldingham Shore, the name was changed in the 1890's to St. Abbs. The new name was derived from St Abb's Head, a rocky promontory located to the north of the village, itself named after St. Aebbe. St. Abbs was originally called Coldingham Shore. Prior to any buildings the fishermen who worked their boats from the beach resided at Fisher's Brae in Coldingham. These fishermen had to carry their fishing gear the one and a half miles down a path.

Gran Canaria (Spain)
Gran Canariais the second most populous island of the Canary Islands, with population of 845,676 which constitutes approximately 40% of the population of the archipelago. Also, it is third most populous island in Spain after Tenerife and Majorca. Located on the Atlantic Ocean about 150 kilometers (~93 miles) off the northwestern coast of Africa and about 1350 km (~838 miles) from Europe. In the late 20th century, its superhighways, among the first in the Canary Islands, were opened and ran around Las Palmas, and were later extended to the north coast and the airport and subsequently to the south coast to account for increased tourist traffic.

La Palma (Spain)
La Palmais the most north-westerly of the Canary Islands. La Palma has an area of 706 km2 making it the fifth largest of the seven main Canary Islands. The total population is about 86,000, of which 18,000 (2003 data) live in the capital, Santa Cruz de la Palma and about 20,000 (2004 data) in Los Llanos de Aridane. It is possible to walk alongside many of the aqueducts, a popular activity for tourists (similar to the levadas of Madeira). The tour to the Marcos y Corderos waterfall and springs is also popular.

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